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Author Topic: Research re 7LH - 2  (Read 25598 times)
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« on: 15 September 2011, 10:47:32 pm »

stevebecker
Veteran Forum Member
 


1629 Posts    Posted - 04/04/2005 :  08:21:00 AM 
Mate,
I am unsure if Tom Waslin is your man but to add there were four Waslin brothers in the 7th LHR.

Andrew, Thomas and William all embarked with the 5th Reinforcments to the 7th LHR while George went with the 6th Reinforcemt. But your right they did all join together.

All served on Gallipoli and Bill (William) was killed in Nov 1915 and Andrew was wounded in Dec.

Surprisingly both Andrew and George were discharged in the UK between Aug and Oct 1919 while only Tom was RTA in June 1919.

S.B

P.S

Bill beat me.

Yes you are right my records show a large amount of crimes being comitted during this time but weather they say compare to early 1915 and the problems around the time of the Wasa before Gallipoli is something to look at further.

As to the FGCM of these two men, Tom Waslin's was around 2nd Dec 1918 while Clarie Thomas's was around the 14th May 1919.

Cheers

S.B

Bill Woerlee
Senior Forum Member
 

Australia
656 Posts    Posted - 04/04/2005 :  08:27:10 AM   
Geoff
G'day mate

I suspect that you are correct.

Many FGCMs took place on down time of active service units. I have just examined all the records of the 9th LHR on Gallipoli and found only one FGCM for the whole time they were there - from May to December 1915. The FGCM was held to prosecute a group of troopers who broke into the stores, pinched the rum rations and got themselve blind drunk on the night of 29 November 1915. Of the 4 blokes tried, only two were convicted - 91 days Field Punishment 2 for that offence - but it was later commuted to 28 days. Indeed, one of the fellows received 3 months imprisonment without hard labour but that was commuted to 91 days Field Punishment 2 although he served only 28 days.

Cheers

Bill

Robin Hammond
Forum Member


Australia
18 Posts    Posted - 04/04/2005 :  09:17:08 AM 
G'day all:
It's good to see a bit of interest has been aroused by my comments about Clarrie's war service and his later career as a gangster.

HOWEVER, please all be assured I am NOT attempting to blame his war experiences for his later career as a criminal - NOT IN ANY WAY - what I am looking at is his life experiences leading up to the 1920s when he was active on the streets.He was very young when he enlisted (14 the first time and 15 the next). I have to look at how his military training and life as a soldier affected his later development, particularly in view of his age. As you know, he would have been in his most formative years and his experiences with older youths and men - drinking, fighting, mil. training, the camaraderie he experienced, etc. - would have all helped form his behaviour. BUT this doesn't mean it's the total story, I know. His family life, genes, personality, all played a big part. I just have to get the whole picture.

When he first enlisted, at the age of 14, he was, as troopone says, at Cootamundra. He was discharged for the reasons troopone gives but in actual fact the reason was that his family tracked him down and hauled him back, mainly because of his age.

He again enlisted the following year - at the age of 15 - and by this time his family had given up on him so let him go. Yes, he spent a relatively short period in actual combat and a fair bit of time with malaria, etc.

Steve: Thanks for your comments. There is no mention on his medical record of any incidents of shell-shock or wounds in battle. However, after his court martial he ended up in hospitalin Cairo with apparent insomnia and debility and his record is marked NYD Mental - a shorthand for 'Not Yet Diagnosed shell-shock'. I've put in a request to Dept of Vet. Affairs to see if they have his file and await their reply. I suspect, in view of what I know about his later activities, that he was bunging it on, but don't want to prejudge without getting some more facts.

No, he didn't have a police record prior to his enlisting but did get a couple of fines by the civil police during his period at Menangle Training Camp for riotous behaviour with a group of his soldier mates while out drinking.

I do have his court martial records and the significance in what he did for my thesis lies in the fact that they are the first incidents of the type of standover tactics he was to use later in life in his career as a standover man. He and Trooper Barry first robbed a Greek shopkeeper at bayonet point and a couple of days later an Arab shopkeeper and his friends, again at bayonet point. In both instances they'd gone to these premises looking for alcohol and women.

AGAIN, this is not an attempt to blame his war service. Yes, of course he was hanging around Egypt bored and dying to get home and I'm sure he was only too happy to get up to mischief. But in relation to his later activities on the streets of Sydney I have to look closely at all of this without placing blame anywhere in particular.

Osschap: The Brit. was a man by the name of H.V. Barry. I have no further info. on him as the FGCM records only mention his name.

Geoff: If you can give me the name and author of the second book you've offered to copy, I'll check the local university library to see if it's in their holdings. They have quite a good collection of military literature. Thanks again. All this discussion helps to get things into perspective.

Robin

stevebecker
Veteran Forum Member
 


1629 Posts    Posted - 04/04/2005 :  10:37:59 AM 
Robin,
The British soldier you may be looking for in Herbert V. Barry 2/Cpl East African Regt (35) who later served with the Egyptian Army Service Corps as Pte (7223).

He later went to the 2nd British Div Sig Co as he remained in the Army post war that I can find.

I sorry I didn't notice how young this man was and your more then right that getting in with the wrong company can lead to many a man's down fall, particularly if they are inclinded to take the easy option or look for the sence of danger.

The rush you get when under fire can be hard to lose as I well know and it is adictive, but weather he picked this up with his mates while serving his country and or acting as a theif is anyone's guess but its possible.

S.B

osschap
Forum Member



5 Posts    Posted - 07/04/2005 :  6:43:17 PM 
Thanks for the info regarding Waslins. Thought I would start a new topic rather than hijack this one with irrelevent questions. Jamie
Geoff
Senior Forum Member
 

Australia
501 Posts    Posted - 09/04/2005 :  11:48:13 AM 
Robin,
I will despatch the material to you this week. The second book is very rare only AWM & a few State libaries are likely to have it.

You can have the copies for buckshee. But, I would ask that you send me a copy of your thesis when completed.

Cheers
Geoff S

Geoff
Senior Forum Member
 

Australia
501 Posts    Posted - 14/04/2005 :  11:24:45 AM 
Robin,
The information I promised to send you has been posted to your address today.

Cheers
Geoff S

Geoff
Senior Forum Member
 

Australia
501 Posts    Posted - 26/04/2005 :  8:42:43 PM 
Robin,
Thankyou for the card.

Best of luck with research.

Cheers
Geoff S

Geoff
Senior Forum Member
 

Australia
501 Posts    Posted - 26/07/2005 :  08:42:52 AM 
Robin,
Have a look at the topic Anzac Provo Corps.(under General discussion)

It mentions a book by Geoff Barr that I think you might like to have a look at as part of your research. I have not read this book, but it might prove insightful for your thesis.

Cheers
Geoff S

It was the book that I mentioned to you in a previous post that was due for publication.



Robin Hammond
Forum Member


Australia
18 Posts    Posted - 28/07/2005 :  3:21:07 PM 
Thanks Geoff. I've ordered the book from the library - it sounds most useful. Robin
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